Friday, November 28, 2014

Yankees can wait on David Robertson

The New York Yankees have been more or less quiet this offseason while others in the American League East and around the rest of Major League Baseball have signed some top-flight free agents. As usual, this leaves some fans clamoring for the Bombers to make a move, and apparently one of the Yankees’ best beat reporters is getting itchy too.

Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News wrote a column Friday suggesting the Yankees need to sign David Robertson already. My view, what’s the rush?

I agree with Feinsand and countless others who feel that bringing back Robertson makes absolute sense. I also feel like the Yankees think the same thing. They’d have arguably one of the best 1-2 end-game duos in all of baseball for the next several seasons. Why the hesitation?

Much like I proclaimed where it concerned any Yankees’ response to the Boston Red Sox haul of Hanley Ramirez and Pablo Sandoval, the Yanks do not need to begin inking deals to counter their arch rivals. To be fair, Feinsand says he's impressed with the Yankees staying the course thus far.

In my opinion, the Yankees can financially tolerate letting a market produce for Robertson. As of now, the only team we know that has made an effort is the Houston Astros. Should the Yankees be worried about them?

Why should the Yankees fire the first salvo where it concerns Robertson? As Feinsand rightly says, money is not an issue for the Yankees.

"It can’t be money. The Yankees have plenty of that. They might not want to shell out nine-figure deals to the big free agents, but Robertson doesn’t fall into that category."

I look at it like this; since they have the money, why would they want to set the price? Let the Astros or some other team do it and then, if the Yanks truly want to keep Robertson around, they’ll beat it. I’d venture to guess not many teams would outbid the Yankees for a closer considering how easily they come and go around the league.

I also believe the Yankees would be just fine without Robertson, handing over the reigns to Dellin Betances. I don’t want this necessarily, but the Yankees are not going to lose an abundance of games because Robertson signs elsewhere. They'd still have a pretty solid bullpen, with some up an coming arms, and could pull the trigger on some lower cost relievers to fill set-up roles behind Betances if they’d like. I don't believe they'd need to answer with Andrew Miller or Luke Gregerson as Feinsand alludes to.

Feinsand implies that the Yankees letting Robertson go defies logic.

"The Yankees have watched Robertson blossom from 17th-round draft pick to All-Star setup man to stud closer. Now they’re going to let him walk away at the age of 29 as he enters his prime? It makes no sense."

It’s clear the Yankees consider it more important to handle other business before Robertson. They might have already spoken with him about this. I can picture general manager Brian Cashman saying something along the lines of this.

'We need to handle some other positions first, we want you to return but we will get to it in due time, when we know more about the rest of the roster.'

I think that’s fair.

In the end, Robertson knows the Yankees are going to be involved. Perhaps a team offers him a substantial deal that the Yankees simply do not want to match. If that happens it will not be the end of the world and it surely wouldn't have mattered if the Yankees made the first offer.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Yankees could stay in-house at third and second base

As the New York Yankees watched the Boston Red Sox make two splashes in the free agent market Monday, one of the moves will begin a domino effect forcing them to turn their attention to one of their offseason priorities, Chase Headley.

With Pablo Sandoval off the third-base market, agreeing to a five-year, $95 million deal with a club option according to CBSSports.com’s Jon Heyman, Headley will use that figure to bolster his contract desires.

The Yankees were always going to have some competition for Headley’s services. The San Francisco Giants will surely get involved with Headley and it can be expected that the Toronto Blue Jays and Chicago White Sox who both showed early interest in Sandoval could check in on Headley. The San Diego Padres, who dealt Headley to the Yankees, might seek a reunion with Headley, but it seems unlikely as they continue to pursue Cuban defector Yasmany Tomas.

The Yankees would be happy with Headley for a three-year stint, but it seems apparent to me that it will take a four-year commitment and anywhere from $52-60 million to get the job done. If the term and salary gets that high and the Yankees balk, they could fall back on some in-house options.

First, they can place Martin Prado at the hot corner. He’s played more than 3,000 innings at third base in his career and has shown to be a more than adequate defender (5.4 UZR-150 for his career at third). It has been roundly thought that Prado would occupy second base assuming Headley returned. If Prado moves to third and the Yankees want to test the youth movement at second base, they have two highly regarded players who could fill the role.

Rob Refsnyder and Jose Pirela have made considerable movement through the system, with Pirela also impressing at the major league level once called up last September. The Yankees could allow Refsnyder and Pirela to compete for the second base job in spring training.

Refsnyder is a work in progress on the defensive side, while Pirela is an average defender. Both players can hit, and while not of the ilk of Robinson Cano, they would surely not be any worse than opening the season with Brian Roberts at the keystone. Steamer projects Refsnyder to be a 2.5 fWAR player if given 600 plate appearances, while Pirela is estimated at 1.9 fWAR.

Sure, the Yankees could check on trade options for third base (Aramis Ramirez) or second base (Howie Kendrick), but why not take this low-cost approach which has plenty of upside and costs nothing from the farm system?

Any money saved from losing out on Headley could be quickly portioned to the starting pitcher, shortstop and reliever roles the Yankees are looking to fill. It’s possible they could go full tilt toward Max Scherzer, Jon Lester or even James Shields if they decided not to invest in Headley for four years. Or they could sign Brandon McCarthy and a similar starter to add depth to a suspect rotation in terms of injury risk.

For once, it would be nice to see the Yankees trust in their initial game plan. One which they said would be free from over-the-top spending. What better way to fill voids than from within and with players who are proven (Prado) and those who have significant upside (Refsnyder and Pirela)?

I agree Headley should be a priority, but if he’s going to cost four years and $60 million, I’d begin thinking about Prado, Refsnyder and Pirela as bonafide options instead.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Monday, November 24, 2014

Will Yankees overreact to Red Sox deals with Ramirez and Sandoval?

“Great, the Yankees are sleeping while the Red Sox win the offseason.” - ABC Yankee Fan


The New York Yankees have a tendency to create plans for the structuring of their roster and then perform a complete about-face when seemingly pushed into the corner by American League East rival Boston Red Sox.

The BoSox have reportedly signed a five-year, $90 million deal with Hanley Ramirez and apparently completed another five-year contract for just under $100 million with Pablo Sandoval.

Ramirez and Sandoval were arguably the two best positional players in this year’s free-agent market. The Red Sox, after a 71-91 record and a last-place finish in 2014, are looking to jump right back into World Series contention.

The Red Sox have good depth in their farm system and might trade Yoenis Cespedes for pitching which they need. It’s true, the immediate future looks good in Beantown.

But, now that the Yankees have seen their nemesis make splashes within a 24-hour window, should they change the game plan of staying out of the high-ticket free agent market this offseason?

After spending close to $500 million in guaranteed contracts before the 2014 season, the word from Yankees’ camp has been that they would look to piece together their roster this offseason via trade and/or midtier free agents.

Will these signings push the Yankees into the Max Scherzer or Jon Lester sweepstakes? I’ve detailed at length the potential for either player coming to the Bronx here and here. I’m not sure the Yankees should become reactionary to signings they had no intention of making and simply because it was the Red Sox who made them.

The Yankees have been said to be interested in signing Brandon McCarthy and potentially another midtier starter to compensate for a rotation with loads of questions. They also need to fill the void left by the retirement of Derek Jeter at shortstop. Finally the Yanks will either decide to retain David Robertson as their closer, or move to fill a late-inning role in the bullpen with Andrew Miller being a top candidate.

With all of these needs, should the Yankees stay the course as laid out not long after they failed to reach the postseason for the second straight season? Or do they throw that idea in the scrapheap and make a move for Scherzer or Lester?

In my view, if the Yankees want Scherzer or Lester, it is fine, but it shouldn’t be because they lost out on two players they had no intention of signing, or because they are worried about who is headed to Boston, Toronto or elsewhere.

One thing seems certain. Once the ink dries on Sandoval’s deal, the Yankees will go to work on bringing Chase Headley back. I stressed in September that the Yankees would be wise to go full tilt with Headley. Now, with Sandoval signing for close to a nine-figure deal, the Yankees will have to shell out somewhere in the neighborhood of four years and $50 million as far as I can see.

The Yankees will likely have some competition from the San Francisco Giants and maybe the Toronto Blue Jays who were said to be eyeing Sandoval. It remains uncertain if the Padres will try to bring back Headley, though they did make an offer to Sandoval to fill the void left by trading Headley to the Yankees this past summer.

To sum up, the Red Sox got better (in the immediate future) but it should not push the Yankees into panic mode. Winning on the field is much more valuable than winning the offseason.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Friday, November 21, 2014

Yankees protect Mason Williams; further roster decisions loom

The New York Yankees added Tyler Austin, Danny Burawa, Branden Pinder and Mason Williams to their 40-man roster Thursday eliminating the chance of them being selected in the Rule 5 draft to be held at the upcoming Winter Meetings.

Austin seemed to have the best chance of being protected in his first season eligible for the Rule 5 draft, and the selection of power arms in Burawa and Pinder was not entirely surprising. It seemed like the Yankees had a decision to wrestle with in Williams which I discussed earlier this week.

Williams, 23, has underperformed across two straight seasons after being thought of as a top prospect in the organization and across baseball prior to the 2013 season. He had a DUI arrest in 2013, and then showed up to spring training last season out of shape.

The Yankees obviously feel that due to his age, and natural talents, he has the ability to turn things around. The other possibility is that he’s been brought up in discussions with other teams in trade talks, or it’s a combination of the two.

Williams seems to understand the magnitude of the Yankees’ decision tweeting this morning that he feels fortunate to be protected from the Rule 5 draft.



The Yankees now have nine outfielders on the 40-man roster and 39 players in total. The Yankees will have their fair share of decisions along the way as they will add at least a shortstop, a third baseman, a closer (or high-end reliever) and potentially two starting pitchers before spring training.

In my view the likelihood of Williams surviving all of that is minimal unless the Yankees move another outfielder currently on the 40-man roster. Of the nine outfielders, it would seem to me that Williams ranks last among them though it could be argued that Slade Heathcott might occupy that spot.

The Yankees have several pitchers currently on the roster who might be removed before they have to worry about cutting outfielders. In my view those players include David Huff and Esmil Rogers who could be non-tendered, as well as Preston Claiborne who could be designated for assignment depending on how the negotiations go with David Robertson, and the possible addition of any other relievers from the free agent or trade market.

No matter which way you cut it there will be plenty of additional changes to the roster before players arrive in Tampa mid-February.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Thursday, November 20, 2014

Yankees are not screwing up Chase Headley negotiations

FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal pushed out a couple of tweets regarding the New York Yankees and their pursuit of free-agent third baseman Chase Headley. He was immediately tattooed with a balanced number of tweets in agreement and others opposing his statements.

Here are Rosenthal’s tweets.





Here is one from the folks at River Ave. Blues.

Look, both Rosenthal and the gang at RAB are top-notch at their craft. But I believe they are missing the boat here.

Just because the Yankees have not leaked info on any Headley negotiations, it doesn't mean they're not on top of the situation. I believe it is safe to assume Headley is wisely waiting for the bigger name in the third base market, Pablo Sandoval to make his decision. It doesn't take a rocket scientist folks, or a super-agent to figure this out.

Why would the Yankees want to establish the market here when they can let the San Francisco Giants, Boston Red Sox or Toronto Blue Jays do that with Sandoval?

And of course, the loser of Sandoval was always going to be in on Headley. Why wouldn’t they be? But, if the Yankees went out and made an outrageous offer to Headley, well north of the four years and $48 million that MLB Trade Rumors' Tim Dierkes suggested he could get, don’t they run the risk of missing the mark if Sandoval ends up staying within the market expected?

The Yankees are going to have to overpay to maintain Headley regardless in my opinion. To suggest the Yankees are not acting quickly enough here gives little respect to Headley’s (and his agent’s) intellect.

There is no rush for Headley, and certainly there isn’t for the Yankees since they are not involved in the Sandoval negotiations which are just beginning to unfold with offers submitted by the Giants and Red Sox in recent days.

Both sides in the Headley talks are wise to wait it out. If Headley decides to sign with one of the losers of the Sandoval sweepstakes it will not be because the Yankees were not aggressive enough in November.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Will Yankees protect Mason Williams?

Just two years ago Mason Williams was a top prospect in the New York Yankees farm system. Come Thursday, Williams may not be protected by the club and thus be available in the Rule 5 draft held during the Winter Meetings.

Williams was ranked as high as 32nd of all baseball prospects by Baseball America, 41st by MLB.com and 51st by Baseball Prospectus before the 2013 season. He was at one time considered the player who would be manning the outfield in New York sometime by the 2015 or 2016 season depending on who you read at the time. Now he is ranked 17th in the Yankees system according to MLB.com, and he’s nowhere near reaching the majors.

Furthermore, after consecutive seasons of declining performance along with questionable commitment -- he was arrested in 2013 for DUI and came to camp out of shape in 2014 -- Williams could be left unprotected and available to be swooped up in the Rule 5 draft (FAQs here).

What should the Yankees do?

Year Age Lev G PA R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2010 18 Rk 5 19 0 4 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 4 .222 .263 .222 .485
2011 19 A- 68 298 42 94 11 6 3 31 28 12 20 41 .349 .395 .468 .863
2012 20 A-A+ 91 397 68 107 22 4 11 35 20 13 24 47 .298 .346 .474 .820
2013 21 A+-AA 117 537 63 117 24 4 4 28 15 9 40 79 .245 .304 .337 .641
2014 22 AA 128 563 67 113 18 4 5 40 21 8 47 68 .223 .290 .304 .593
5 Seasons 409 1814 240 435 75 18 23 134 85 44 132 239 .267 .323 .377 .700
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/19/2014.

The Yankees are very much set up in two of their outfield positions with Jacoby Ellsbury signed for the next six seasons and Brett Gardner for the next four, maybe five years. Carlos Beltran has two more years left on his deal and the Yankees fourth outfielder, Chris Young, is signed for just 2015. So, it would seem that anyone from the Yankees system might fill a fourth outfielder spot in 2016, and based on Williams’ recent performance, it will not be him.

The Yankees have players such as Tyler Austin, Kyle Roller, Mark Montgomery, Branden Pinder, Danny Burawa, Nik Turley and Matt Tracy to consider for spots in addition to Williams according to The LoHud Yankees Blog reporter Chad Jennings.

The Yankees currently have 36 players on their 40-man roster leaving four spots available. Of those players, Slade Heathcott, Ramon Flores, Eury Perez are all listed as outfielders. Jose Pirela, regarded primarily as an infielder, can play in the outfield as well.

It seems that the Yankees have other players who right now have a better chance to not only reach the big leagues, but have an impact than Williams. Jennings does note that many clubs might find Williams’ speed, good defense and left-handedness as assets for a fifth outfielder bench role.

But would the Yankees truly miss him? Will the Yankees simply take a chance that others will view Williams as a work in progress, and not worth putting on their roster and skip him in the Rule 5 draft?

My guess is that the Yankees do not protect him and he goes unclaimed. It's not a foregone conclusion that he's never going to reach the level he was once seen to possess. However, the last couple of seasons do not point to a player on the rise, but one who might have been rated too high initially and one of many prospects to never fully develop into the star many once believed they could be.

Do you think the Yankees protect Williams or gamble with him being selected in the Rule 5 draft? Let me know in the comments.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Yankees Rumors: Revisiting Max Scherzer; why not Jon Lester?

According to CBSSports.com’s Jon Heyman, the New York Yankees may be revisiting their plan to stay away from the top free-agent starters on the market, namely former Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer.

Heyman notes a slow to develop market on Scherzer and intimates that the Yankees have gradually begun to reshape their strategy on making a splash this offseason.

The Yankees have predominantly been linked to Brandon McCarthy and other midtier starters like Jason Hammel and back of the rotation arms such as Chris Capuano thus far. A move onto Scherzer might indicate that after some deeper thought, the Yankees front office is fearful that one or more of the returning starters will suffer from an injury recurrence and they’d need a top-shelf starter.

While Scherzer fits that bill, so too does Jon Lester and Heyman wisely makes note of the Yankees' respect for the long time Boston Red Sox hurler. Heyman also indicates that Scherzer could be more attractive than Lester or James Shields for that matter because of less wear on his arm. I went into detail on this recently. However, after giving it some thought, I think Lester might be the better option.

While both pitchers can dial it up, they are not simply power guys, so it is also likely that they’ll be able to adjust to diminished velocity and use of ancillary pitches as their contracts and arms age. I believe Lester is more apt to do this seamlessly.

While I like the notion that Scherzer has less mileage on his arm, I think that his mechanics look to be so much more work than Lester’s. Scherzer, whose dipping velocity is catching up with him (from 94.2 mph in 2012 to 92.8 mph in 2014 according to PITCHf/x data via FanGraphs), possesses the classic hard-working “power pitcher,” motion and he can still dial it up to 98 mph. Lester’s motion seems more in control, less demanding on the body, and his fastball has shown less of a drop-off in the same time frame (92.0 mph in 2012 and 91.5 mph in 2014, while topping out in the 95 mph range this past season) in my far from expert opinion.

There is something about Lester which makes me feel that he’ll end up being more effective as he nears his middle 30s. I don’t think that Scherzer is going to completely breakdown, but I sense that Lester will be able to acclimate to changes in his repertoire over time. I don’t have any empirical evidence here, call it a hunch.

I also like the idea that Lester is a lefty, and the Yankees could use a viable southpaw starter with the deterioration of CC Sabathia seemingly in full effect. I look at Lester very similarly to the way I felt about Andy Pettitte. Very steady. Incredibly reliable. Extremely competitive.

Heyman remarks that both Scherzer and Lester will have their share of suitors and no offers have been made to either pitcher that he knows of. So what is the Yankees play here?

Might the Yanks sense that the slow to develop market means that others are standoffish in reference to Scherzer because of the suspected costs and they'll be able to get him for less than they originally suspected?

It’s possible the Yanks feel they should establish the market for Scherzer and somehow wrest him from the Chicago Cubs, Red Sox, Detroit Tigers or whoever else decides to jump into the fray.

There is also the chance that the Yanks are simply stirring the pot, looking to get a glimpse at where other teams have set their value for Scherzer. Further, it could be a ploy to get Scherzer’s value established so that Lester’s can be better determined. Lester does have the benefit of no draft compensation attached to his signing. Isn't that something the Yankees should consider?

The long and short of it is this – the Yankees are re-thinking their offseason strategy now in regards to the rotation. They are said to be specifically looking at Scherzer, but they should give as much thought if not more to Lester. Either way the Yankees would have to open up their wallets and hope they pick the right guy for the long haul.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Monday, November 17, 2014

Yankees: How long before Bird is the word?

When a New York Yankees prospect makes headlines, it sometimes seems like it comes as part of a trade rumor. The Yankees have long used prospects as a tool to upgrade their roster midseason and often times send away a player who develops into a serviceable player elsewhere.

Things might be changing soon with the emergence of first baseman Gregory Bird. Bird, a fifth round selection in the 2011 First-Year Player Draft, was named the 2014 Arizona Fall League Most Valuable Player this past Saturday.

Bird is the first Yankees prospect to win the award. It came after a monstrous display at the plate. Bird led the AFL with six home runs and 21 runs scored. He was second in RBI (21), third in extra base hits (12) and slugging percentage (.556) and sixth in batting (.313). He hit a towering home run in the AFL All-Star Game which seemed to put his name on the map for those not familiar with the Yankees’ farm system.

Bird has progressed so nicely in the minors that some believe he could be ready for some major league time in 2016. That of course is very convenient as the Yankees current first baseman Mark Teixeira will be in the final year of his eight-year, $180 million contract. How great would it be for the Bombers to develop a power-hitting first baseman? It would be pretty fantastic actually!

Bird is not just a good hitter, he’s a patient one. He led all minor leaguers with 107 walks in 2013 and collected 63 free passes in 2014 (102 games).


Jim Callis of MLB.com gives a promising review.

"His left-handed swing can get long at times, but Bird's strength produces power to all fields and could play especially well in Yankee Stadium if he turns on pitches with more consistency," Callis said. "He projects as a .260 hitter with a healthy on-base percentage and 20 homers per year."

Bird seems to be an incredibly grounded individual, knowing that success comes with hard work and dedication.

"I was in Double-A the last month and played here for a month, so I got some reps against higher competition," Bird told MLB.com. "I learned to slow the game down. It'll be huge. I felt like I made some improvements at first base, but I feel I still have a long way to go."

Bird, 6' 3" and 215 lbs., has dealt with back issues, thus his move to first from catching once drafted. This could end up sapping some power as he ages, but at 22 years old, it shouldn’t be a major problem provided Bird manages it by building and maintaining a strong core.

Bird’s work the last two seasons and his display in the AFL have certainly put him into the discussion of getting some home grown positional talent up in the Bronx. We’ll have to pay particular attention to his start in 2015, likely at Double-A Trenton, and how quickly the Yankees look to advance him to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

So long as Bird continues to be selective at the plate, and works to drive the ball to all fields, it seems as if Teixeira’s replacement could be in the system providing the Yankees with resources to spend elsewhere for 2017.

A welcome occurrence, indeed.

Statistics courtesy of Baseball-Reference.

Logo courtesy of SportsLogos.net.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.



Friday, November 14, 2014

2014 MLB awards breakdown

Now that the Most Valuable Player award has been handed out I felt it would be good to take a look back at my selections (explained in-depth here) made for the Baseball Bloggers Alliance (BBA) and the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America (IBWAA) compared with the final results of each organization and the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA).

One thing to keep in mind, my picks (as well as those submitted by members of the BBA and IBWAA) were made before the finalists were announced by BBWAA.

Without further adieu here is the breakdown.

Award
Rank
Baseball Stance & Beyond
Final
BBA Votes
Final IBWAA Votes
Final BBWAA Votes
AL ROY
1
Jose Abreu
Jose Abreu
Jose Abreu
2
Masahiro Tanaka
Masahiro Tanaka
3
Dellin Betances
AL MOY
1
Buck Showalter
Buck Showalter
2
Buck Showalter
Mike Scioscia
Mike Scioscia
3
Llyod McClendon
Mike Scioscia
Ned Yost
Ned Yost
1
Corey Kluber
Corey Kluber
2
Felix Hernandez
Felix Hernandez
Corey Kluber
Felix Hernandez
3
Jon Lester
Chris Sale
4
Chris Sale
Chris Sale
Jon Lester
Jon Lester
5
Max Scherzer
Max Scherzer
AL MVP
1
Mike Trout
Mike Trout
Mike Trout
2
Jose Abreu
Victor Martinez
3
Michael Brantley
Michael Brantley
Michael Brantley
4
Corey Kluber
Jose Abreu
Jose Abreu
5
Jose Bautista
Victor Martinez
Robinson Cano
6
Josh Donaldson
Josh Donaldson
Jose Bautista
7
Jose Abreu
Jose Altuve
8
Victor Martinez
Felix Hernandez
Jose Bautista
Josh Donaldson
9
Alex Gordon
Nelson Cruz
Miguel Cabrera
10
Corey Kluber
Jose Altuve
Miguel Cabrera
Felix Hernandez
NL  ROY
1
Jacob deGrom
Jacob deGrom
Jacob deGrom
2
Billy Hamilton
Billy Hamilton
Billy Hamilton
3
Ender Inciarte
NL MOY
1
Matt Williams
Matt Williams
2
Clint Hurdle
Clint Hurdle
Clint Hurdle
3
Matt Williams
Bruce Bochy
Bruce Bochy
NL Cy Young
1
Clayton Kershaw
Clayton Kershaw
Clayton Kershaw
2
Adam Wainwright
Johnny Cueto
3
Johnny Cueto
Adam Wainwright
Adam Wainwright
4
Jordan Zimmermann
Madison Bumgarner
Madison Bumgarner
5
Jordan Zimmermann
Jordan Zimmermann
NL MVP
1
Clayton Kershaw
Clayton Kershaw
Clayton Kershaw
2
Clayton Kershaw
Andrew McCutchen
Giancarlo Stanton
3
Giancarlo Stanton
Giancarlo Stanton
Andrew McCutchen
Andrew McCutchen
4
Anthony Rendon
5
Jonathan Lucroy
Buster Posey
Jonathan Lucroy
Anthony Rendon
6
Anthony Rendon
Buster Posey
7
Buster Posey
8
Yasiel Puig
Johnny Cueto
Yasiel Puig
Adam Wainwright
9
Adam Wainwright
Adrian Gonzalez
Josh Harrison
10
Josh Harrison
Carlos Gomez
Carlos Gomez
Anthony Rizzo

So, I was spot on with six of the eight awards’ top vote-getter compared with the BBWAA and five of eight with both the BBA and IBWAA.

I was in the right in mix on each of the American League ballots, which makes some sense since I predominantly cover the New York Yankees. I was not as high on Victor Martinez as others.

Apparently I completely missed the boat on Johnny Cueto in the NL Cy Young race compared with my counterparts. I was also off the mark with Freddie Freeman in the NL MVP voting.

Well, there you have it. While it’s all very subjective it’s also very fun to submit ballots. Maybe one day I’ll get a chance to have a real say in the awards.

How about you? Who did you have on your ballot? Did the BBWAA get it right this year? How about the other groups? Let me know in the comments below.

Christopher Carelli is a freelance sports writer and sports media strategist. His baseball commentary has also been published on Yahoo Sports, the FanSided network, Sportsideo and linked multiple times on MLB Trade Rumors’ Baseball Blogs Weigh In. He is a member of the Internet Baseball Writers Association of America, the Baseball Bloggers Alliance and the BYB Hub.